FOUR THINGS TO ASK A STRANGER (almost a parody)

Welcome to Mary Anne Radmacher's blog.

One way to get to know a person you've just met is to ask them to tell you about their favorite friends. It's said that a person essentially becomes an aggregate of the five people with whom they spend the most time.

There's another telling question to ask a stranger. It's all about a book.

1) Is there one book that you have re-read and will read again (and again)?
2) What is the most recent book that you've read and what stands out to you most?
3) What is the title of a book you recommend most often to friends?
4) What was the last book you read that made you so sad when it came to the end? (Because you wanted to keep on reading, not because the ending was sad!).

If the person you are just getting to know has never re-read a book, can't remember what stood out from the last book they read, doesn't recommend books to friends and has never felt sad to stop reading an excellent book...

I suggest that you stop conversing with them. And, perhaps, run. Kidding (not kidding). Perhaps you might consider striking up a conversation with someone else that you might want to get to know. AND start THAT conversation off by recommending a book you've recently read...

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Grateful for You


Wednesday, November 6, 2013

My Happy Childhood

I recognize that I can tell
the stories of my childhood
in ways that give wings to these days.

It's my story.

I can tell it any way I want.

My friend, Frankie Kiehl, told me repeatedly as she lay dying of pancreatic cancer, that she had
one important message to leave with me.  She said in many different ways that there is only
one "storyteller" of my childhood: me.  I Can Tell The Story any way that I want. 

I was put in a room, by myself, a lot.  My parents were surprised by me and it turns out their
plans for a "second honeymoon"  on their 25th wedding anniversary were cancelled because
they had me, instead.  I was their second honeymoon.  With trumpets.  And drums. And
lots of dancing.  More dancing than they bargained for.  So I got invited to a room, by
myself, a lot.  That could be a sad story.   But the wings on the story?   I was given the
opportunity, as a youngster, to learn to be entertained by my own thoughts.  Those
experiences prepared me for the somewhat solitary life of an author.  Wow. Thanks, mom
and dad!  And while they were at it, they instilled in me a lifelong love of books.  Because
there were always a stack of books in the room.  And they were adult books, not books for
"children."  So that experience gifted me with an expansive vocabulary.  And a love of
dictionaries.  And encyclopedias.  It's been a mighty helpful interest.

See how that works? 

Such a simple difference between VICTim and VICTory.  I choose VICTORY. 

Tell the stories of your childhood in ways that give wings to these days.  mary anne radmacher